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Marcus Garvey

Burning Spear

1975

Buy At Rough Trade
Marcus Garvey
Album Summary

Marcus Garvey is the third album by reggae artist Burning Spear, released in 1975 on Fox Records in Jamaica and then internationally on Island Records later in the year. The album is named after the Jamaican National Hero and Rastafari movement prophet Marcus Garvey. A dub version of it was released four months later as Garvey's Ghost. This was the first album by Burning Spear recorded for producer Lawrence Lindo, better known by his handle taken from the assassin of Lee Harvey Oswald, Jack Ruby. Apparently, Lindo and Burning Spear realized the opening track to this album, "Marcus Garvey", on their first meeting. Island Records, whose founder Chris Blackwell had been instrumental in breaking Jamaican reggae artists Jimmy Cliff, Toots and the Maytals, and Bob Marley to an international audience, then made a deal to release it internationally, but believed the original Jamaican mix of the album to be too threatening, or at least too commercially unviable, for white audiences and therefore remixed it into what they considered a more palatable form, outraging him. The Jamaican release also does not include the final track, "Resting Place", which had only been issued as a single there. The backing musicians, whom Lindo named the Black Disciples, had been assembled from the Soul Syndicate and the Wailers.On July 27, 2010, this album was remastered and released by Universal's Hip-O Records reissue imprint in tandem with the dub version on one compact disc. The album was listed in the 1999 book The Rough Guide: Reggae: 100 Essential CDs.

Wikipedia

Rating

3.19

Votes

11005
Genres
Reggae

Reviews

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Tue Mar 16 2021
4

I've been listening to lots of 1970s reggae lately, so happy to give this another spin. Another record that is clearly important and influential, but which is not one of my favourites. HOWEVER, just as I was thinking how it always sounds a little too slick, I read that the Island release was remixed by the label without the artist's blessing/input. Can't believe I didn't know that. Now listening to the original Jamaican mix for the first time, and it has so much more of the darker, atmospheric sound I look for in roots reggae. Also just generally finding that the record is clicking with me more than it did in the past. None of the tracks are filler, and the instrumentation is great. My only mild criticism is that I'm not a huge fan of Burning Spear's voice (or let's say "the lead singer", since he hadn't yet taken the Spear name for himself). It's good and it fits the whole sound, but it doesn't compare to some 1970s reggae vocals. Overall, loved this a lot more on revisiting (and hearing the original mix).

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Fri May 20 2022
4

Normally not a reggae guy, but I really enjoyed this record. The vibe was great, I enjoyed the political angles of it, and the more laid-back angles too. Loved the inclusion of the flute, and loved the unique vocals (see "Tradition") Guess I should check some more real roots reggae. Favorite tracks: "Marcus Garvey", "Slavery Days", "Live Good"

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Thu Jun 24 2021
5

Brilliant album - uplifting and full of righteous anger. Burning Spear is one of the key artists in roots reggae and this is my favourite of his albums. The dub is rather special too.

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Wed Feb 23 2022
5

So good I played it twice in quick succession. A beautiful album. I know *of* Burning Spear but this was a lovely deep dive into an album’s worth of his work. Need to listen to lots more I think. Particularly enjoyed Tradition on first spin. The harmonies throughout are fantastic. And that voice…excellent. This is how music with a message should be done.

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Wed Jan 13 2021
4

Never was into reggae, but always appreciate an album inspired by political and social movements.

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Thu Jan 14 2021
4

Pure distilled passion and energy. Colourful arrangements, meandering and beautiful. (Although I would love to hear the original Jamaican pressing)

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Fri Oct 29 2021
5

I love this album - one of my favourites. If you don't like reggae, I don't think it is going to convert you - but I love the raw elements - his plaintive voice, the 'country' horns, poewrful lyrics in patois etc etc

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Mon Dec 06 2021
5

This is different gravy! Top tier roots reggae - cool arrangements and a conceptual consistency that lends the album a rare potency. Burning Spear has a helluva voice. Love it.

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Wed Mar 16 2022
5

Listening to a lot of reggae these days, not sure why. It seems to have a purity of purpose and authenticity that just resonates with me. Music I need these days, I guess. Burning Spear really does the job, bringing on good feelings and a sense of clarity. Roots and culture! One Love!

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Sun May 30 2021
4

I'm generally a fan of reggae from this era. Reggae is the most amazing genre to me: a musical form originating from such a small geographic area, which was a melting pot of influences, that then evolved into something so distinct and unique and went on to then influence others around the world in turn. I'd be curious to hear the original Jamaican mix. I went on to listen to the dub (instrumental remix) version of the album "Garvey's Ghost" as a follow up bonus listen and I almost like it better.

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Mon Feb 15 2021
4

Love me some good reggae music. Makes you feel like you're relaxing on a beach

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Mon Jan 18 2021
4

Very solid old school reggae. Reminds me of toots and maytals.

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Wed May 12 2021
4

Nice, some reggae! Honestly wouldn't have expected an album like this one here. Without knowing much at all about reggae, I think this album is great. Some great conscious lyricism, contrasted by the pleasant island vibes. I feel like I'm on island time, but I've got a serious zoom call in an hour. This was really enjoyable! Feels much more authentic than the ska/reggae album we had a little while back from The Specials. Favorite tracks: Slavery Days, Marcus Garvey, Tradition, Live Good. Album art: I love this one. The art style is fantastic, the text is bold and strong, and the imagery perfectly conveys the heft of the subject matter. Very, very cool. 4/5

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Mon Jun 07 2021
4

I honestly thought that I didn’t like reggae, but I guess I just didn’t like other reggae. This album was really dope and I can see why it belongs here. I don’t know that I’ll listen to it again, but I enjoyed the ride. I also love the talk about Marcus Garvey and the Black Star Line. What a crazy part of history.

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Thu May 06 2021
4

The beats of chill reggae album makes me pine for a nice day on a tropical beach. Listening to the lyrics though, Burning Spear's singing about very serious and unhappy themes: slavery, poverty and oppression. Made me look up information about Marcus Garvey, Burning Spear and Jamaica's political history that I am glad to have learnt.

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Sun Apr 24 2022
4

Allow 'Marcus Garvey' to inform you of another side of the Rastafari movement, well beyond the stereotypical spliff-smoking dreadlock dudes often portrayed on film, and more often than not humorously. You won’t find any humor from lead vocalist Burning Spear, though, nor the Winston Rodney and Phillip Fullwood’s lyrics he’s singing. Neither is there any reference to the spiritual value of marijuana. This is all about political activism, and inspired by one of Jamaica’s greatest, prophet Marcus Garvey. But ‘no one remember old Marcus Garvey,’ Burning Spear laments, while imploring his fellow Jamaicans (throughout the entire album) to ‘humble yourself and become one day somehow you will remember him.’ For keeping the memory alive honors those who paved the way for us, and is a daily exercise in a faith in a righteous God who will one day enact divine retribution on the wicked, making things right. This is old school, old testament. The clicking of horses’ hooves may be heard in the drums, the throb of the low bottom bass like the rumbling of chariot wheels, with brave horns leading the charge. This is pure Reggae music, the sound of the soil. And Burning Spear is tilling it up. Lyrically, unquestionably Rastafarian, and so always implying, ‘or else.’ On ‘The Invasion,’ for example, humility is called forth from the people, manifesting in the practice of ‘wadada (love),’ but for the purpose of appeasing divine wrath. Now, I suppose, being a humble, loving person for whatever reason is a better practice than being arrogantly hateful or hatefully arrogant; still, an awful lot of this LP was forecasting righteous payback on the wicked, and redemption for the oppressed, but said redemption dependent upon the condition of a show of genuine humility. Again, always in the background of the lead vocalist’s admonition to ‘Do right,’ for example, on the opening song, is the silent refrain, ‘Or else.’ No mercy for the wicked may be found here, nor ‘shall (they) enter this (Jordan) river… Jordan river a go roll.’ ‘You go your ways, and I go mine,’ Burning Spears states on ‘Give Me.’ I demand you give me, and in the widest possible application, my freedom. Or else. While I don't share that theological understanding, I am at least familiar with it, as well as the lives of some of those with whom this kind of liberation theology resonates. ‘Slavery Days’ was the most difficult, but instructive song to listen to, with its painful recount of the abominable commerce of slavery. It’s a litany of sorrow to the repeated refrain of ‘Do you remember the days of slavery?’ But again, to the accompaniment of optimistic, hopeful horns rising above the drone downtempo vibe underneath, as if to caution the listener to not allow the significance of their lives and deaths to be lost. Black lives matter. More than matter. There is a bigger picture. ‘Garvey’s old yet young.’

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Tue Apr 26 2022
4

I was expecting a burning spear of anger and righteousness and got a welcoming circle of friends warming their hands.

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Sat Sep 03 2022
4

My first concert was Jimmy Cliff, of whom I was totally ignorant. Burning Spear opened and I was blown away by the stage presence and the bass. I got into Jimmy Cliff but never followed up on Burning Spear's work. This is fantastic for a reggae novice like myself. Love the combination of politics and art.

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Sun Sep 25 2022
4

Distinct memory of pulling this for a college radio show - no recollection what inspired it, I wasn’t much of a reggae listener and had probably never heard anything besides a Bob Marley greatest hits album. I also remember actually reading up on Marcus Garvey as a result, though typical of my early 90s memories it’s hard to recall how I did so in those pre-internet days. I guess I must have gone to the damn library. Anyway my first introduction to the wider world of reggae and dub.

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Tue Oct 18 2022
4

Beyond Bob Marley, I’m not too familiar with reggae. This album however felt very familiar. Beside the classic reggae beat, Burning Spear incorporated a lot of soul and almost Motown like motifs. The music had a great groove and was a lot of fun to listen to. The lyrics confront a colonial legacy and elaborate on Rastafarian beliefs. Burning Spear want the listener to know who they are, what they stand for, and what they believe.

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Sun Nov 27 2022
4

Reggae is not one of my regular, go-to genres and in many instances I would probably say, "it's not my thing." BUT, I do appreciate the subversive political message of some reggae, and this album hits that mark on the head. Far from the stereotype of laid back party music to listen to while you smoke pot on the beach, this album is edgy and angry, with a powerful political message. Musically, I don't like it as well as Bob Marley (but that's a high bar), but perfect production and instrumentation isn't everything. This album is very cool, and I can see why it's on the list. I'd probably give it a 3.4-3.7 if I had more granular options, but I'll round up to 4/5 because it's different and cool.

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Wed Feb 07 2024
4

Has pointed political commentary ever gone down as smoothly as Burning Spear manages on their major label debut? That’s the enduring magic trick of great reggae: music and message are one, and that oneness is a beautiful thing. If songs like “Marcus Garvey” or “Slavery Days” were attempted in some other musical format, they’d be insufferable. Yet in the hands of Burning Spear, repeated spins reward even the casual listener. As expected, the groove is hypnotic, the mood serious but buoyant, the vocals earnest but easy, the lyrics a heady blend of protest, liberation, and Rastafari devotion. In the middle of the decade where reggae music broke wide open, becoming a global phenomenon, Burning Spear made their mark with a voice of urgency and eternity, sounding both of its time and fit for any era. Their message still sounds like it very much matters and their music still puts heads to nodding and bodies moving. That’s a rare feat, and that’s why this record has endured.

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Wed Mar 20 2024
4

The generator seems to think I hate reggae, because I gave the two Police records on this list one star. I’m just here today to state unequivocally: I don’t hate reggae. I just can’t stand The Police…and honestly, they aren’t even a reggae band. Thank you for your time.

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Mon Jan 18 2021
3

Reggae really isn't my thing but this might be some of the best I've heard. It's somewhat a shame that it is clear that there is a message that is so specific to the Jamaican context and black experience that I only begin to understand. There are surely those who get a lot more out of the content of the lyrics than I ever will. I will say that the lyrics have a haunting quality to them and yet a certain melancholy to some of the songs, not necessarily for what was but for what could have been. It is a beautiful but heavy album. There are movies that I have watched that I describe as great movies that I will never watch again, and I have finally found my musical equivalent. I'm glad to have listened to it but it is unlikely that I will seek it out again, but I am interested in exploring more of Burning Spear's discography though.

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Sun Feb 11 2024
3

The trance-like nature of the form speaking about human horrors in an almost matter-of-fact way somehow makes the horror more impactful. The musicianship is really good -- they're clearly good at their art.

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Sun Jan 17 2021
2

Lyrically a very impressive album. Releasing this in the west in the 70s was very bold and must've been incredibly difficult. Musically, it just isn't for me. I find reggae super repetitive even in the best instances and this entire album suffers from the same issues I have with almost all reggae.

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Thu Jan 21 2021
2

Lazy music, lazy lyrics. Makes you feel lazy or want to smoke a spliff. Nothing to really dislike, but reggae is definitely not my thing. I did actually listen to the whole album as I drove to and from the chemist.

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Sat Jun 26 2021
2

I came into this album with a preconceived notion that most reggae sounds similar. I did not have my mind changed. The rhythm I get, but the same two chord progression gets old.

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Wed Nov 10 2021
2

I'm really not a reggae fan, and this won't convert me. I found it to be 33 minutes of the same song with no dynamic changes or anything interesting to keep me interested. Background music at best, for me. But fans of reggae probably love this.

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Fri Jul 07 2023
2

Why is reggae always the same song over and over? FS: Marcus Garvey

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Fri Jul 07 2023
2

Every song sounds exactly the same. This sounds like every raygay album song I’ve ever heard. Boring and too long. The bass sounds good I guess?

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Wed May 31 2023
1

I would rather listen to almost anything else besides reggae

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Wed Jan 13 2021
5

very good, will listen again

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Wed Jan 27 2021
5

If you’re a Marley fan, this is fantastic

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Thu Jan 14 2021
5

pretty chill. i haven't really listened to reggae albums outside of bob marley. it's interesting to listen to more perspectives about black oppression.

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Mon Jun 07 2021
5

Dope reggae album. Want to keep track of this one so I’m giving it a 5. Good music for hanging

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Mon Jun 14 2021
5

An OKs favorite of mine. Brilliant album..Winston Rodney's singing is incredible especially on Days of Slavery Not sure what else there is to say . 5 🌟

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Wed Nov 03 2021
5

Splendid. Musically flawless, such a warm, rich sound. Lyrics are mournful but ultimately spiritual and full of hope. Fave Songs: The Invasion, Jordan River, Marcus Garvey, Red Gold and Green, Live Good

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Thu Nov 18 2021
5

Great album, resting place, slavery days.

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Tue Dec 14 2021
5

I'd heard the first two tracks before quite a bit, but the rest was new and showed a lot of depth. Will likely add to the rotation and learn more about this album.

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Mon Jan 10 2022
5

The most emotionally intense reggae album I've evert heard. It is evident in every note Winston Rodney sings. His singing is a tour de force, the songs are compelling and the music matches the intensity of the singing. 5 🌟

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Fri Jan 28 2022
5

That's some very adorable music!! Relaxing, refreshing, perfect for afternoon work BGM.

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Sat Jan 29 2022
5

grooviest mf album I’ve heard all month 10/10, tragically short tho

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Wed Mar 23 2022
5

Awesome, especially in the current mini heatwave here! Love a bit of reggae, and using it to tell the story of one of my all-time heroes is genius. Hard to pick a best track so I'll say Al of them!

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Tue Apr 12 2022
5

the first reggae album i’ve ever really listened to. i cant super judge it, but i really enjoyed listening to it, and it was super political. felt it dragged a bit on the late first side, but there are some really excellent songs.

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Tue May 10 2022
5

Roots Reggae at its finest, absolute classic album. From the lead off title track through he whole album not a bad song.

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Sun Dec 04 2022
5

Powerful and groovy. Reggae with plenty to say. Might start going into my rotation.

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Wed Dec 21 2022
5

Vibey, hard-hitting, atmospheric, and meaningful. What else could I want?

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Mon Jan 02 2023
5

FANTASTIC! Wary of giving an album 5 stars so early in the game, but I really loved this album. Each song has a unique feel, but every one is organic, soulful, and heartfelt. Loved the bass lines. Beautiful.

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Mon Jan 30 2023
5

Beautiful! Already listen some songs

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Sat Feb 11 2023
5

haha, that is in my collection since many many years. A MUST HAVE for the summer and for political reasons!

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Sat Feb 18 2023
5

I listened to both the international version found here in the book and the original version. Both are excellent. I don’t have much more to say, other than you should play this album and play it loud, on a good system - it will blow you away.

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Mon Mar 06 2023
5

Happy music, no juice needed. history, reality, uplift, be be beeee.

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Tue Mar 14 2023
5

I'm sure bad reggae album exists but thankfully I have not heard one.

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Thu Apr 13 2023
5

One of a number of releases that legitimately lay claim to the greatest reggae album ever. The instrumentation is superb and Winston Rodney is at his peak as a leader. This is more " Rastafarian" focused than many of the other popular reggae releases from this period, which provides a link to the overt political tone. A classic.

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Thu May 11 2023
5

I'm convinced there is a central reggae sound and the likeability of the albums drop off pretty quickly with deviations from this centre. Thankfully this has that central sound.

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Sun May 28 2023
5

Great. My kind of reggae. Really nice and interesting musically and wel produced.

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Fri Jul 28 2023
5

My brother and I listened to this on a long bike ride around the greater Stevenage area and I can't lie, we felt cooler than we cooler than we could possibly deserve. Groovy, tight, political, concise. The pulse syncs with your own very nicely and you become giddily aware you are listening to a perfect expression of the form. Reggae classic, no question about it.

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Mon Aug 07 2023
5

Great reggae album from the 70s. Got it on a cd together with the dub version, and one should really listen to both albums in one go to fully appreciate this album (similar to "In the Light / In the Dub") but anyways.. 5 stars of course.

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Tue Aug 15 2023
5

A great album. He re made it away from Island Records as Garvey's Ghost. Which was great too. I really enjoyed listening to this and then went down a dub rabbit hole all afternoon.

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Tue Aug 15 2023
5

High quality reggae from the master probably one of the genres mist defining and awesome albums, the qualityvof his voice never fails to astound.

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Thu Sep 21 2023
5

One of the best Roots Reggae albums: tight, funky, dense, political, dark, brooding, danceable. There are just too many adjective one can use to describe this album. It’s seminal but also unlike any other album in it’s genre. Please just listen to it if you haven’t already.

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Wed Oct 25 2023
5

day 148. so chilling and soft, i can listen to reggae forever 9.5/10

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Thu Dec 07 2023
5

Tradition is probably my favorite Burning Spear song. Summer before last, D fell asleep at a Burning Spear show 💤

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Thu Jan 18 2024
5

Loved this. A powerful reggae masterpiece

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Wed Jan 24 2024
5

I really like this album. First thing on this list I was totally unfamiliar with Substantial and engaging but still fun to listen to

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Mon Feb 05 2024
5

Lyrics: Burning Spear's lyrics in "Marcus Garvey" are deeply rooted in Rastafari and Pan-Africanism, reflecting the artist's commitment to social and political consciousness. The album takes its title from the iconic Jamaican National Hero Marcus Garvey, a key figure in the Rastafari movement. The lyrics often convey messages of resistance, empowerment, and unity. The poetic and metaphorical language used by Burning Spear enhances the album's lyrical depth, making it a timeless exploration of African identity and heritage. Pros: Poetic Depth: Burning Spear's lyricism goes beyond mere storytelling, delving into profound philosophical and spiritual themes. Political and Social Relevance: The album's focus on Garvey's philosophy and broader themes of self-determination and resistance adds a layer of social consciousness to the lyrics. Cons: Repetition: Some may argue that the repetitive nature of certain lyrics, a characteristic of reggae, might be a drawback for listeners seeking more varied content. Music: The musical arrangements in "Marcus Garvey" are a perfect embodiment of roots reggae. Burning Spear's vocal delivery is distinctive, characterized by his deep, resonant voice. The instrumentation, featuring traditional reggae elements such as skanking guitar, melodic basslines, and steady drumming, creates a foundation that complements the lyrical content. The album also features the famous group The Black Disciples as the backing band, adding to the authenticity of the sound. Pros: Authentic Reggae Sound: "Marcus Garvey" epitomizes the roots reggae genre, showcasing the quintessential elements of the genre with a raw and authentic feel. Vocal Delivery: Burning Spear's emotive and powerful vocal delivery adds an extra layer of authenticity and sincerity to the music. Cons: Limited Musical Experimentation: While the album excels in its chosen genre, some listeners might wish for more experimentation in terms of musical styles and arrangements. Production: Jack Ruby's production on "Marcus Garvey" is often praised for capturing the essence of Burning Spear's vision. The album's sound is characterized by its simplicity and clarity, allowing the message in the lyrics to take center stage. The use of dub techniques, with echoing vocals and instrumental breaks, adds a layer of depth to the overall production. Pros: Clarity and Balance: The production strikes a balance between the vocals and instruments, ensuring that the listener can fully absorb both the message and the music. Effective Use of Dub Techniques: The incorporation of dub elements enhances the overall listening experience, adding a dynamic quality to the sound. Cons: Lack of Studio Experimentation: Some critics argue that the album's straightforward production might lack the studio experimentation found in other contemporaneous reggae albums. Themes: "Marcus Garvey" revolves around themes of African identity, resistance against oppression, and the teachings of Marcus Garvey. The album serves as a cultural and historical document, preserving the ideologies of the Rastafari movement and the broader Pan-African struggle. Each track contributes to a cohesive narrative that reinforces the themes of unity, self-awareness, and social justice. Pros: Consistency in Theme: The album maintains a consistent thematic thread, creating a cohesive and immersive listening experience. Cultural Preservation: Burning Spear's dedication to preserving and promoting African culture and heritage is evident in the thematic richness of the album. Cons: Niche Appeal: While the themes are powerful and meaningful, they might limit the album's appeal to a specific audience interested in reggae's cultural and political dimensions. Influence: "Marcus Garvey" has had a lasting impact on the reggae genre and beyond. It is often cited as one of the essential reggae albums, influencing subsequent generations of musicians. The album's messages of empowerment and resistance resonate far beyond the Caribbean, inspiring listeners globally to explore their cultural roots and stand against oppression. Pros: Legacy: The album's enduring influence is evident in its continued relevance and the recognition it receives as a cornerstone of reggae music. Global Impact: Burning Spear's messages have reached a diverse audience, transcending geographical and cultural boundaries. Cons: Limited Mainstream Recognition: While influential within reggae circles, "Marcus Garvey" may not have achieved the same level of mainstream recognition as some other seminal albums from the era. Conclusion: "Marcus Garvey" by Burning Spear stands as a landmark album in the reggae genre, encapsulating the spirit of roots reggae with its potent combination of conscious lyrics, authentic music, and thematic depth. Despite its niche appeal, the album's influence has been far-reaching, solidifying its place in the annals of reggae history. The cons, such as repetition in lyrics and a lack of mainstream recognition, are minor when compared to the album's overall impact and significance. "Marcus Garvey" remains a powerful testament to the potential of music to convey profound messages and spark social change.

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Thu Feb 08 2024
5

I am no Reggae expert, but this was very enjoyable and obviously extremely authentic.

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Wed Feb 21 2024
5

Damn I love all the grooves on this thing, I don't know if the songs were getting better as it went on or if i was just really getting into it. The production is great too, the horns, vocals, other instruments are just the right volume, and the basslines pop right in the center. As a big fan of the bass, i'm slowly learning that i've been missing out on reggae and dub music.

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Fri Mar 01 2024
5

This is the reggae I wish more people knew about.

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Fri Mar 08 2024
5

I really enjoyed this! Maybe I should listen to more Jamaican music...

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Wed Apr 03 2024
5

This is like the soundtrack of my childhood

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Wed Jan 20 2021
4

Solid roots reggae. Worth revisiting.

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Fri Feb 05 2021
4

Cool reggae. Good background music for working (though I feel bad for listening so casually when he's actually singing about slavery and stuff)

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Tue Mar 16 2021
4

Heerlijk reggae album met wat bekende hits erop

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Wed Jan 13 2021
4

I like it - not sure why the horns are a bit flat in places - but great album!

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