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From the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.

Fifth Dimension

The Byrds

1966

Wikipedia

Fifth Dimension

Rating

3.04

Votes

3364

Reviews

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3

Je croyais pourtant avoir été clair dans ma critique de la semaine dernière au sujet des Byrds et de leur incapable leader Gene Clark... Je vais donc devoir me répéter. Gene Clark et sa bande de joyeux singes n'apportent aucune plus-value à la musique. Ils reprennent un coup l'air de La Marseillaise (cf Eight Miles High), plagient ensuite le bon vieux Jimi (cf Hey Joe) même si ce dernier n'a sorti son tube que l'année suivante, et se permettent de clore leur album avec deux morceaux indisponibles dans votre zone géographique. En résumé, un immense foutage de gueule.

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4

Exit pop stars The Byrds, enter psychedelic folk rock pioneers The Byrds. Very very good.

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4

That was a fun slice of time. Way more varied and sonically interesting than I would have expected. Hey Joe was a pretty wild cover.

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5

Awesome - hadn't heard Mr Spaceman in ages! Love that guitar tone.

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5

only tambourine man but this is betta

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5

Ho lala this week album selection is refined to my psychedelic tastes. LSD and carpet ride is all I have been aspiring to my whole life. Loved this album very much. So very mystically 70s!

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5

Du bon vieux rock qui s'écoute tout seul

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5

great

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5

Really good 4.7 stars

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5

A fantastic album, just an absolute joy to listen to

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5

FIVE STARS An all-time classic and a personal favorite of mine. Up to 1966, The Byrds had enough assets in their game to consider they had already established the perfect formula in their very first LP, *Hey Mr Tambourine Man*, and that there was no reason for them to veer off-course three albums in after the success they had. That formula is that cliché most listeners still associate The Byrds with today: use Dylan's shortest, catchiest tunes, cover them by adding melifluous vocal harmonies that are complete u-turns from Bob's rough, nasal timbre and inflexions, wait for those covers to hit the charts, and then cash in. Of course, you could still replace Dylan with Pete Seeger and The Bible (see "Turn, Turn, Turn"), traditional tunes or everything in between. But in its core, the formula didn't change a bit. Not that individual members of the band were frauds and impostors as they performed those skilled transformations. Coming themselves from the US folk scene, they had learned how to translate those folk staples into a more pop-oriented language, but thanks to their original background, they could also instill those rendition with a much-needed sense of authenticity. Both serious and commercial, folk and rock, The Byrds were at the crossroads of everything the sixties were all about. With Gene Clark, The Byrds also had a main songwriter in their ranks, admittedly, and the covers were interspersed with originals, too. But even if Clark seemed like a competent songwriter in his own right, this didn't fool audiences. As influential as The Byrds were on the overall sound of the mid-sixties, they were first and foremost seen as performers. And it was never a problem. The sixties going as fast as they did, it soon became one, however. Especially when Gene Clark left the boat at the exact moment when true authorship started to become a huge plus for pop audiences on both sides of the Atlantic. After Clark's departure, Jim McGuinn and David Crosby had no choice but to step in and increase their songwriting output. That some reviewers have considered that the two guitarists were still in the process of learning the ropes of that trade in 1966 is a little baffling given how the originals on this album could easily be deemed superior to most of Clark's endeavors. The original songs shine throughout the whole LP, leaving many earworms in their trail, from enticing opener "5D" to the John Coltrane and Ravi Shankar-inspired "Eight Miles High", a cryptic track (partly written by Clark before he left) about soft drugs--a tune logically banned on the radio--often quoted as the the first psychedelic rock song ever penned. *Psychedelic*. The word is like that magic carpet on which most of the band members sit Ali-Baba style on the album's front visual. It is a promise to fly to outer worlds of the mind, a promise that's also in keeping with the Sci-Fi themes in some of the songs. "Mr Spaceman" is for instance a tongue-in-cheek country-rock pastiche of sorts referring alien abductions. And the fifth dimension of "5D" is one inspired by Einstein's foray into theoretical physics, not lysergic drugs, contrary to audience's expectations at the time. But such misunderstanding is not necessarily a betrayal of what the song--and the album to which it inspired the name--is all about. Open your mind. Feel that awe (and possible terror, too) when the gates of perceptions are blown far wide. As hackneyed and cliché that philosophy may read today, what's impressive about the album is how fresh, effortless and spontaneous the results of that preliminary foray into a new world appear today. That pop freshness is partly explained by the fact that the Byrds were instigators of that psychedelic trend, and not mere followers of it (the rougher and more garage-oriented version of that trend exemplified by The 13th Floor Elevators came out in the exact same year, for instance). And like many other instigators they were not necessarily understood as they should have been. Short yet insistent bridges and breaks with reverse-tape-recorded guitars, raga-like flourishes and other sitar-inspired riffs abound during the record. The move was challenging for general audiences, yet The Byrds took their chances, catching some fans and even music critics off-guard. The covers were also more interesting and riskier than anything that the band had ever attempted (no Dylan anthem to be heard there). It's a risk that paid off, generally speaking, and nowhere did it pay off more brightly than on that mysterious musical rendition of a poem by Turkish poet Nâzim Hikmet, a quite obscure reference for western audiences. "I Come And Stand At Every Door" is indeed as hypnotic as it is slowly powerful, yet never does it come off as a pretention dirge, so beautiful its intricate harmonies are. At its core, it is a miniature lesson in patience and meditation, one that Crosby would use to great effects again in his own song "Everybody's Been Burned" on the next album. But it's mostly one of many tracks on the album that manages to transcend tts sixties psychedelic context to become something a little more timeless than that, and one can only regret Crosby didn't *really* explore this trend further later on. Obviously, opening your mind also encourages a spaghetti-at-the-wall approach. Even as recently as the last ten years or so, some critics have indeed complained of the topsy-turvy nature of this record marking the Byrds' transition from folk-pop translators of Dylan's repertoire into psychedelic adventurers. But complaining about any lack of cohesiveness here might be missing the point, since the twists and turns in the tracklisitng are part of the appeal here devised for receptive souls tired by standardized listening (and thinking). It's the sort of standard The Byrds had actually set upon themselves during the earliest part of their career, and one can guess they were tired, too. Fortunately, it didn't take them long to find a way out. After *Fifth Dimension*, The Byrds would even use what they had learned from the recording of this preliminary masterpiece to great effects on their two next records, often heralded as their very best. I sometimes wonder why those records, which are a bit of a mess themselves, are never judged as harshly as *Fifth Dimension*. Maybe it's because it takes *more* time for certain minds to open, and that contemporary critical reaction only caught up with The Byrds once Crosby was out of the picture, namely with *The Notorious Byrd Brothers*, leaving the two previous LPs with a more "difficult" critical reputation. But the magic carpet started flying here, with this very album. And to this mind also tired of standardized thinking, it has never flown more beautifully than when it soared like this to the lysergic skies, and beyond them. Number of albums left to review or just listen to: 971 Number of albums from the list I find relevant enough to be mandatory listens: 11 (including this one). Albums from the list I *might* include in mine later on: 7 Albums from the list I will *not* include in mine (as I think many others are more important): 9 Albums I might not be able to judge (some might end up on my final list but it's because I recognize how culturally important they are): 2]

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4

This album was pretty good but kind of samey to me. I couldn't really distinguish between most of the songs, but I liked the sound. I think this folky kind of rock is pretty cool and I would listen to more of it.

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4

A nice album. Nothing of a surprise, given what I've heard of them, but this was pleasant to listen to.

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4

funky as hell, video game music typa thing from a AAA trailer for fallout or something.

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4

I enjoyed this and should listen again

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4

Strong start with the title track, and I'd never heard their excellent version of "Wild Mountain Thyme" before. The rest of the album sounds like a Byrds album. Definitely worth listening to when you're in the right mood.

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4

good album

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4

One of the best folk rock album of the sixties. Modern sound to it.

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4

I really like the guitar tone and their use of vocal harmony. It's almost like a more rock-y Simon and Garfunckel.

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4

Really enjoyed this one!

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4

Pretty good. Not my favorite Byrds album. 7/10 1. Eight Miles High 2. Wild Mountain Thyme 3. 5D (Fifth Dimension)

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4

4*

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4

Right from a Wes Anderson movie. Happy, folksy, druggy. David Crosby style harmonies. Fun, 60s listen. Lots of variety. Definitely enjoyed it.

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4

Jai bien aime, plus experimental et pousse que l’autre album de byrds dans cette loste.3.5

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4

interesting stuff

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4

Some decent tracks but probably not anything I’ll come back to. I think something that I’ll nitpick about several 60s albums on this list that are in the rock/folk/psychedelia area have production that sounds fuzzy (mostly on the guitars and vocals) and that decreases my overall enjoyment of them. 7

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4

Nice 60s vibes. Beattles style in some parts, but less moving

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4

Agradable y muy melódico. Un gran avance

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4

"Eight Miles High" Released: March 14, 1966 "5D (Fifth Dimension)" Released: June 13, 1966 "Mr. Spaceman" Released: September 6, 1966

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4

Los Beatles de California, muy crema

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4

7/10. birb. Their version of Wild Mountain Thyme was a bit lame, actually

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4

A classic psychedelic sound- guessing it's the inspiration for a lot of later work given the year. Somehow, it holds up today. A pleasant amount of variety in each song.

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4

.

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4

Ah yeah

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4

Now that's folk-rock. One of those bands that I often heard about but never listened too. I was surprised

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4

Rather enjoyable album. 4/5

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4

Reminded me of Crosby, Stills and Nash mixed with the Beatles a little bit. Good but I'd have to be in the mood for it.

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4

Great album.

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4

I really enjoyed this one. Quirky and all over the place and very of it's time for sure, but what a time. Particularly like the wild guitar playing on this one.

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4

Amazing.

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4

some really wacky guitar parts (Eight Miles High) that sound like a small mammal running up and down the fretboard. love the trippy vibes, the 60s must have been fun

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4

good

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4

Good album. Nails the cool, chill, transcendental, raw, dirty energy of 60s LA. The lyrics, transitions and sound mix can get a bit clunky at times. Love the sitar/guitar sound, the harmonies abd there are some standout parts from the rhythm section. 3.5 but giving a 4.

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4

The sound of psychedelia. Perhaps not quite as good as their earlier "classic pop" but still beautiful harmonies.

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4

Great album! Lots of variety Favourite tracks: Hey Joe, Wild Mountain Thyme, Mr. Spaceman

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4

Really easy listening, can't really fault it. Nothing jumps out as an absolute banger but equally nothing jumps out in the other direction either. Been listening for this for 4 hours on repeat I think.

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4

60s album? Check. Psychedelic? Check. Has to be a 4/5 then doesn't it really? That it does, that it does.

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4

Like so many albums from this time, you can feel the beginnings of psychedelic music

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4

I love this. It's incredibly uneven, and feels as though there wasn't much consensus internally regarding direction. But that's the kind of album I love; a bit scattered, but intensely artistic throughout, with a real sense of building a new movement for pop music.

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4

My late grandmother loved this band, so this album reminds me of her.

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4

There are some original songs, some are average

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4

Blues rock

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4

Pretty good early psych rock. Didn't realize 5D was about the theory of relativity...

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4

A solid offering, again highlighting their folky style of rock. Good guitars and harmonies against some strong songwriting.

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4

I love Eight Miles High - a cracker of a song. And there are some other good tracks there. I'll go back to it.

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4

Mom can we listen to The Beatles? We have The Beatles at home. The Beatles at home:

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4

Excellent.

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4

começando a chamar na psicodelia

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4

Fine record, has a few nice moments of harmony but nothing inherently outstanding.

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4

Such an influential album. Guitars are spectacular

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3

This is the second Byrds album on here. It's kinda spacey, but also still has a bunch of traditional folk sounding songs on it. Some of the guitar work is like faking solos haha. Guess this was right when everything kinda changed just before the late 60s? Ultimately it doesn't do much for me, although it's a happy enough little album. 3/5.

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3

Not being able to give this a 3.5 hurts.

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3

I was interested by this album and how it seemed to really represent the era of '60s, psychedelic rock. While it's perhaps not one I would listen to again, I enjoyed getting to explore this sound and thought it was a good listen to gather more of an understanding on it.

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3

Pleasant surprise - sounds quite fresh and I enjoyed it.

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3

Trevligt album.

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3

Actually pretty good.

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3

Some pretty jaunty tunes, some slow and some about drugs. What’s not to like

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3

Influenced the influencers

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3

IT's okay, I really don't want to listen to the birds right now, especially after hearing their last album not too long ago. It's about 5/8, not going to listen again. Mr.Spaceman was okay.

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3

its ok

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3

Nothing that blew me out of the water, but not bad either!

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3

Considered the "American Beatles," it's obvious to see why The Byrds took LA and California by storm. Their sound, at the time, seems so unique and original. But now, I just wish I was listening to The Beatles.

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3

3.5

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3

Good that there was no bob dylan songs on it, a departure from previous

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3

Fair

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3

Production: 8/20 Songwriting: 11/20 Innovation: 11/20 Bangers: 5/20 Emotional response: 14/20 =49 Pleasant

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3

Ehh

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3

Sounded like the mamas and the papas and a lot of the bands in this era. I didn’t see a lot of standout tracks.

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3

middling

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3

Sonically brilliant but even the mesmerizing 8 Miles High can't carry the rest of this album. Hey Joe sounds almost jokey having been deluged with the Hendrix version. The Leaves version is also better!

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3

Our second from the Byrds, and much more of what I knew the Byrds to be: proto-psychedelia. Definitely foundational for the sounds that a lot of bands would explore in the late '60s and early '70s, but personally I didn't get too much out of this. A few tracks I'll return to, but as far as psych rock is concerned, it's pretty tame. Favorite tracks: Eight Miles High, Wild Mountain Thyme, John Riley, Mr. Spaceman. Album art: I really like this one. It's a band photo, but isolating them so small and surrounded by darkness is great, it's like a sensory deprivation tank or something. Very fitting. 3/5

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3

3.6 - Some solid tracks on this: "Eight Miles High", "Why", "Hey Joe." Sounds like fairly typical hippy guitar rock of this era with some psychedelic elements shining through especially in some of the extended guitar solos.

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3

Generous 3

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3

Pionty wymiar, czyli klasyczna plyta klasycznej bandy, pionierow psychodelicznego rokowania juz od samego poczatku dzialalnosci i psychodelicznych aranzacji dylanowych songow, ale jakos nigdy nie mialem okazji przesluchac zadnej ich plyty, do dzisiaj, pionty wymiar, to otwierajacy trak 5D jak najbardziej pasuje, praktycznie wszedzie bardziej lub mniej mozna sie doszukac inspiracji kultura psychodelii, albo jak same byrdsy to okreslany, czyli filozofia, rok filozoficzny takim pojeciem starali sie operowac z tego co slyszalem na wywiadzie z ostatniego instrumentalnego traku, ktory jest raczej komentarzem na temat plyty przez czlonkow bandy, ale ktorych dokladnie to nie wiem, albumik traci najbardziej na tym, ze sluchalem go w stereo ktore bylo zmontowane z wersji mono, wiec takie sterego biednego czlowieka, a w tamtych latach o wiele lepsza jakosc nagran jest w mono, bo stereo jeszcze bylo czarna magia i tak samo jest w tym przypadku, najbardziej to czuc na samolotowym traku 2-4-2, i samplowanymi silnikami, przed odsluchalem myslalem, ze tylko crosby i mcguinn robia robote na wokalach, na niektorych trakach cala banda sie chorkuje dla psychodelicznego viba, bo wokale i tamburinski najbardziej go tutaj buduja, ale znowu niedoskonalosci techniczne wychodza nawet przy nagrywaniu wokalu, na hey joe mozna uslyszec dyszenie do mikro lub inne przebitki, folkowym akcentem jest z pewnoscia dlugosc i budowa trakow, bo zazwyczaj 2-3 minutowe kompozycje nic dluzszego, no i harmonja na kapitanskim traku ala dylanowy niuans, na plejke wedruje 5D i psychodrama city, bo 8 mil wysoko juz tam siedzi, gdybym przesluchal mono wersji pewnie bym o wyzej ocenil, ale spotifaj nie daje opcji, a szkoda bo psychodelia ktora stara sie wejsc w polemike z filozofia to dobry koncept

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3

good

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3

Very weird. 6

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3

Pretty goofy! Some hits and some misses on here. 6/10

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3

Bit bored of it after hearing some of the songs so often.

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3

Jingly

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3

Fair to middling

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3

So high on acid that they forgot how to spell "Birds". Quite impressive that they managed to write these pleasant ditties in that sort of condition really.

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3

Not even real birds.

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3

Ooooh they sound better than the birds I normally end up with. The last one sounded like a hungover Johnny Vegas gargling gravel out of a weasel's armpit. Squealed like a dirty hog when I slipped it in her wrongun. Tells me she was pissing rusty blood out of her ass for 6 weeks. Pints of the stuff. 3 stars and a bag of chips.

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3

sure

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3

Pretty good record

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3

Some great songs, terribly recorded though which Is a shame

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3

this was literally just fine. i can't complain but i definitely can’t rave about it either so very middle of the road. 60s folk rock is generally the vanilla of music

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3

Hard to know what to make of this album, or the Byrds in general really since so much of their output was covers. Apparently this record was important in shaping psychedelic rock, and you can hear that in a few of the tracks. Some nice arrangements and ‘I see you’ and ‘eight miles high’ particularly interesting and impressive in equal measure

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3

Very good memories of this album. And the listening was

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3

5D (fifth dimension): excellent Wild mountain thyme: average Mr. spaceman: very good I see you: good What’s happening?: excellent I come and stand at every door: very good Eight miles high: good Hey Joe (where you wanna go): good John Riley: above average 2-4-2 fox trot: below average Why: very good I know my rider: very good Psychodrama city: average 7/10

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3

5D (Fifth Dimension) is by far the best song on this joint, but still enjoyable nonetheless.

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3

strong 3

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3

I liked this album but I think it falls into this book's pitfall of so much kinda generic classic rock. Good album some good songs

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3

Enjoyed, but think the lead guitarist thinks he’s better than he actually is.

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3

An average album. Nothing really stood out while listening either good or bad. 6.0/10

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3

Goeie sesh! Mr spaceman en eight miles high als mijn favoriete

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3

3.4 tofkes tofkes, kvind het wel goed klinken

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3

mr spaceman of tambourine man?

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3

The Byrds for me are like comfort 60s music, it sounds nice but nothing I'd throw on to listen to. Nice harmonies and a chill tempo for the most part. I'm sure if I grew up with it I'd think differently.

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3

Some really nice sounds, ultimately a bit too pretty for me but I do appreciate that this band and album helped shape rock n roll.

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3

3.5

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3

I liked this one more than the other byrds album

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3

J'aime beaucoup eight miles high et i come and stand by every door. Par contre je suis pas fan de mr. spaceman, qui etait apparemment une des plus appreciees de l'album.

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3

This is one of those albums that speaks so much to it's era, experimental and influential for its time but probably not altogether palatable for modern listeners. The quality of the songs varies overall, but the album still has some great ones. It's like they wanted to try a bunch of stuff and threw everything at the wall, so the songs don't all work together. I liked it better the second time around, so it improves on repeat listening. Musically speaking, it's so pretty and so quintessentially the Byrds. The harmonies are pretty perfect and the guitar work is out of this world. Jangly, occasionally trippy, textured little gems. Fave songs: Mr. Spaceman, What's Happening, Eight Miles High

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3

Again, typical '60s harmonic folk-ish rock. Nothing exciting about it.

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3

What a nice surprise. The Byrds show a nice variety of pleasant harmonies and catchy psychedelic folk tunes on Fifth Dimension. None of it is truly excellent, but it's definitely above average on most parts. 3/5.

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3

Bit hit and miss; weird mix of styles, covers etc. Jangly AF. Eight Miles High is still a tune and I do like What's Happening?

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3

J'ai écouté cet album sans y prêter la moindre attention, étant donné la nouvelle assourdissante que mon camarade robbulière m'a partagé aux alentours du quatre-heures, alors que je degainais une belle nectarine: Jonny Halliday a fait découvrir Jimi Hendrix, en lui proposant la première partie de son concert. Par lien logique, on peut donc en conclure que Jimi Hendrix a chanté devant de gros motards français remplis de whisky, chantant en coeur "Oh Marie, si tu savais". Pas sur qu'il ait connu plus intense durant sa modeste carrière qui s'en est suivie.

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3

I'm not a big Folk rock dude at the end of the day. Don't super care for the psychedelic's sound too much either. I fully understand some people like this one a lot. However, Not for me, I found it kind of annoying at times. I wish I enjoyed the fucking tamborine more as a general rule. I don't.

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3

Not bad, but not quite my case either

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3

El folk psicodélico empezó aquí, o eso dice la wikipedia. Solo conocía "Eight Miles High" pero en general el disco está bien pero no es para volverse loco. Interesante la versión de "Hey Joe" que luego hizo famosa Jimmy Hendrix.

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3

Typische 60s muziek. Niet erg speciaal

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3

Buen disco

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3

Yesterday a Gene Clark album, today the Byrds! The Byrds were real innovators, being on the forefront of folk rock, alt-country, and psychedelic rock. Eight Miles High from this album is an epic song, an all-time classic. It's an amazing accomplishment on its own and stands the test of time. The rest of the album is good, but nothing too special. 3.5 stars.

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3

Not bad not great, liked the early psychedelic aspects

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3

This album makes it clearer to me why the Byrds were pitched as America's answer to the Beatles. The instrumentation and production of this album bears a lot of similarities to Rubber Soul. It's all fine, but not particularly interesting. 3/5

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3

Some bangers, some flops, some great stuff, some low stuff.

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3

Side 1 is my favorite 60s aesthetic. The chiming 12 string. The multi part harmonies. The swirling organ. The innocent, vague, disorienting lyrics. A trippy phased guitar solo. The "Laurel Canyon sound". Quote I like from FJM in current context “The sound of Laurel Canyon is entertainment lawyers screaming at their dogs.” Somewhere around Side 2 it gets a bit threadbare and hollow. So in a way this album represents the arc of the counterculture it embodies. Starts beautiful, optimistic, original, entrancing. Becomes unsustainable and ultimately too one dimensional to adapt to the times a changin'. B+

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3

Great baseline album of 60s era. Comfortable listening

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3

Yay hippies

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3

Meh, didn't love it

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3

Mooi maar iets te veel zingen-bij-een-kampvuur naar m'n zin.

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3

Mooie 60's sound. Ik kan dit wel waarderen al zouden er wel een paar wat pittigere nummers tussen mogen zitten. Het is allemaal wel erg kabbelend en braaf.

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3

Wel oké. Eight Miles High en John Riley vind ik tof, maar verder vind ik het behoorlijk gedateerd klinken.

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3

Niet mijn favoriete album van The Byrds, maar toch best tof!

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3

Forgettable. Didnt enjoy other than spaceman; and that was aighjt.

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3

Very much of their time. I had forgotten that Hey Joe was a cover, Jimi was out here claiming people’s tracks and wiping them out of history

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3

It was ok. Nothing super memorable. Would probably forget about it.

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3

Not a bad album, first half of the album seemed mediocre, but the second half I enjoyed

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3

Another artist I am familiar with and have listened to but first time listening through a full album. Decent folk rock which makes for good background music.

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3

Sure it's a pivotal album in terms of folk pop, country and psychedelia but it is patchy! Again, some great songs, and too many not so great ones. If you want a better cover of Hey Joe, go listen to the one by Love on De Capo, also released in 1966.

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3

Pretty good! I can take or leave this style of music but I enjoyed this well enough, playcounts indicate the better tracks across the board.

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3

Some decent songs! Good bass playing especially on Captain Soul.

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3

It’s fine

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3

It was enjoyable, but I probably won’t go back to it.

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3

I liked this. You could hear the influences this band had on many bands that came after them.

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3

Chilled - prefer to the Beatles.

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3

Non mi è dispiaciuto. Mi ricordano un sacco di gruppi di cui non mi ricordo il nome, lol.

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3

A decent album. Nothing totally wowed me but it was enjoyable.

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3

Nice, if often cheesy psychedelic pop folk.

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3

It is quite appropriate that on 4/20, I got the album with "Eight Miles High" on it. This is The Byrds' 3rd album with the majority of songs without founding member Gene Clark who left during the recording. This album does jump around quite a bit stylistically. They were influenced at the time by Ravi Shakar so a few songs have an Indian influence in the music and guitar (Raga). You hear more of a country influence in a few other songs. And, they do cover four songs. Maybe, the absence of Gene Clark had something to do with this??? Anyway, this album does have "Eight Miles High" which is an absolute monster of a song. Supposedly named after how high you fly in an airplane. Right. Great unique guitars blending together with one playing the Raga (Indian) style and the other one trying to imitate the playing of John Coltrane. Woah! But the sound is fantastic. Considered the first psychedelic song. A few other highlights include "5D" - great Byrd harmonies and "I See You" - the Raga guitar more clearer here. Overall, an fairly enjoyable if uneven listen but there is "Eight Miles High."

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3

It has a very distinctive style, which I enjoy, but I don't know if this soft folk does a lot for me. It's fine

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3

Folksy

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3

We’ve had a lot of albums like this on the list so far. This one is a mix of easy-going soft rock and more psychedelic music. I’d rate it as good but not especially great. Highlights: “What’s Happening?,” “Eight Miles High,” “Captain Soul” Interesting to start to hear repeats of songs on this list. Joan Baez did a version of “John Riley” and of course Jimi Hendrix does the most famous version of “Hey Joe.”

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3

byrds more like the nerds

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3

8 mile high is a brilliant track, some of the others sounded like sub-optimal Beatles

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2

I really liked Why and Mr. Spaceman, but the album has very little replay value for me. Supposedly this band was the answer to The Beatles, and I can kind of see similarities. They are definitely more country-rock though.

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2

1/7 Wasn't feeling the mix on this one. Standout Tracks: 5D, Wild Mountain Thyme

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2

Tråkigt.

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2

nja

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2

Meh, a few decent moments in there but very messy and often unpleasant. An ugly cross between Simon and Garfunkel and the Beatles

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2

Not a huge fan. Appreciate it. Would not listen straight through again

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2

not for me. not yesterday.

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2

Perus kitararallattelua. Pidin enemmän aiemmasta Byrdsin levystä jossa oli vahvemmin Country-meiningit pääosassa. Taustamusiikkina meni ihan ok (paitsi se lentokoneturbiinibiisi), mutta eipä tätä jaksanut kauhean tarkasti kuunnella. Tylsiä biisejä joissa oli mukana typeriä kikkailuelementtejä. Jos edellinen Byrds sai kakkosen, ei tämä ainakaan yhtään enempää ansaitse.

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2

Another big fat NO for the band. Eight Miles High may be the only song I might consider saying that I enjoyed, mostly for the solo.

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2

Debby downer shit en gitaar gepingel

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2

Dit was wel prima maar niet geweldig

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2

nice vocal harmonies. in the second half it sort of looses focus. the first couple of songs are good: 5D and spaceman

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2

Fine, I guess.

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2

An important step in rock and roll that's not for me.

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2

The music was... fine, but nothing stood out as remarkable. Currently trying to figure out whether I am more baffled by "Hey Joe (Where You Gonna Go)" or "2-4-2 Fox Trot (The Lear Jet Song)". Recommended season: Spring

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2

eh

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2

The most generic 60s rock ever. I’ll give it this: it makes me appreciate the Beatles a lot more.

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2

Some cool psychedelic stuff in the beginning but mostly forgettable in the second half

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2

Cool, another band that tried LSD and realized they could make music. I'm really trying hard to come up with new creative ways of saying "this shouldn't be on this list, why do I have to listen to these" but it's Monday so the juices aren't flowing yet. I had this on in the background while I was working and it was relaxing but nothing to write home about.

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2

I still like the jangle and there's some good songs on here. Still very uneven. Hey Joe is terrible

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2

nothing special.

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2

Another fairly boring one.

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2

Leppoisaa 60-luvun hipahtavaa musaa. Vähän surffi-/avaruusrautalankaa. Levy tuli kuunneltua pariin kertaan taustamusiikkina, jäi aika hajuttomaksi ja mauttomaksi lätyksi.

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2

the byrds are what we thought they were. if i wanted some annoying 70s psychadelia, i'd love it.

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2

5.5

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2

It probably did sound like the 5th dimension in 1966 with elements of experimental chamber psych, but in 2021, it sounds very 2D. Pleasant enough...you can hear the lads have had some lsd and are trying something different here, but it wasn't anything that piqued my interest for too long.

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2

first song sounds terrible -- very 60's/hippie/blecchh I think they have a couple of pop-y tunes, so maybe they can get a 2. I'll be shocked if they earn a 3, and not surprised if it's only a 1.

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2

ug... this is going to be painful. its fine. aggressively fine. still two stars at best though. IDK why it rubs me the wrong way so much.

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2

A little bit before my time….was 8 years old but remember 8 miles high

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2

Kinda psychedeliccy, kinda Rock & Roll, but quite soft for what I expected. Still alright, a few ok songs off there but not really my thing.

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2

16th July 2021 Listened on the phone in the morning of a very sunny Friday. Not bad but quite forgettable sadly.

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2

Interesting. Don't know if it was groundbreaking. Quite eclectic.

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2

not my genre

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2

Respect to psychedelic rock and the influences it’s had on future artists but this just wasn’t for me.

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2

easy to listen, hard to adore

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2

Not my thing im afraid

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2

This is when I finally got over to the west side of "the island". My kinda territory. Freshwater, Totland Bay, Tennyson Down, Headon Warren. Sumptuous. Drove along the famed Military Road and gobbled up the sights. Rocked Modern Vampires of the City and Sgt. Peppers in the car. Distant cousins in the way they make excessive studio clowning signify. The Byrds can only dream.

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2

Safety first. There was some Competent Musicianship, and some Solid Songwriting, but nothing that stood out one way or the other, save the impossibly mawkish I Come and Stand at Every Door - and that for the wrong reasons. All told, it sounded like how I imagine 60s music to sound when I’m asked to imagine it (not that often, weirdly!) which either indicates influence or cliche. I’ll give them the benefit of the doubt.

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2

Скучная монотонная нудятина по инструменты, в основном гитара.

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2

A handful of great tunes does not a great album make. Eight Miles High, the big hit, has much to recommend it: thoughtful lyrics, a memorable tune, and Indian influences, although Roger McGuin's 12 string guitar solos haven't aged well. The rollicking Mr. Spaceman is genuinely funny and makes great use of country conventions. Best of all is the title track, with its moving description of a psychedelic epiphany and relentless structural momentum. And of course, the harmonies are gorgeous throughout. Unfortunately, the rest of the album is filler or worse. Wild Mountain Thyme, John Riley, I Come And Stand At Every Door are pleasant enough but forgettable folk-rock. I See You is a lesser attempt at the psychedelia of Eight Miles High. 2-4-2 Fox Trot (The Lear Jet Song) and the instrumental Captain Soul are throwaways. The country-tinged cover of Hey Joe falls completely flat, verging on self-parody. Worst of all is the cringy What's Happening?!?!, a pompous and condescending screed from David Crosby. Why anyone considers Fifth Dimension a classic is beyond me. Maybe people are seduced by the well-known hits and overlook the rest. I dunno.

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2

Hippies

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2

First album I have heard after a long Thanksgiving break (long, but much needed!). Unfortunately, I do not have a ton to say about this one. I enjoyed the initial listen, but I didn't feel myself immediately impressed. It reminded me of a more upbeat/British invasion version of Simon and Garfunkel, but I don't think it ever hit the heights of either that genre or that group. I thought the guitar work was poor overall which is never a good thing, and I felt like I was listening to the album on shuffle as the track order did not seem very cohesive (2-4-2 Fox Trot should not be a closer). However, some parts were catchy, and the vocals were pretty strong so it could have been a lot worse. 2.5/5. NOTE: I had no idea that David Crosby was the singer for this group. Now the folk connection I made makes a lot more sense!

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2

Hey Joe was great, interesting album but overall not for me

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2

This album was uninspiring enough that I can't even be bothered to write a proper set of listening notes.

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2

Snooze

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2

Folk, blues and traditional. Fairly bland, felt a little like a contractual obligation album.

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2

Solid from beginning to end but no YES! songs so it falls flat. Just come up forgettable.

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2

The is a little sugar on this album and thats Eight Miles High which is a track you need to here before you die. The rest of the album is very dated and at times drags you down a folksy psychedelic black hole. I also like the Trad Scots/Irish song Wild Mountain Thyme but it is not as well done as The Silencers or Corries versions. Also Hey Joe is Naw Joe! My least fav to date

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2

On paper The Byrds could have been designed specifically to tick all my favourite jangly, folky, Americana musical boxes. In reality, every time I listen to them I just… don’t get it?

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2

Bit too trippy an experimental, seemed to be trying everything possible and while that's commendable a good album it does not make

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2

Larry Byrds are boring to me... Zzzzzzzzzzz

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2

Just about as 60s as you can get. It gets very samey very quickly, by halfway through I was willing it to end. It's not that it's bad, it's just repetitive and really loses its way quite early on.

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2

Not my cup of tea. Just came off a bit too dated for my modern ears. Songs I did like were: Mr. Spaceman, What's Happening?!?!, Eight Miles High, John Riley, Why, and I Know My Rider (I Know You Rider).

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1

Fuck. No. So continues my hate affair with anything Crosby, Stills, or Nash-ish.

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1

I have no idea why you would start an album with this song. If I was going off of this song alone it’s a one star. I was thinking to myself during the 2nd song what do people do while listening to this? Drive down a dirt road? And then was immediately jarred by Mr. Spaceman. - Ending edit: I didn’t make it all the way through this album and have decided not to try.

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1

ну такое

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1

Too sing songy. Like a children's kid bopz album. 9 people harmonizing the entire song. I know that's their thing, and hey, I think those kid bopz albums sell too. But I'm not a customer.

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Pros: After the third track, the lead guitar playing gets kind of weird and experimental in both tone and melody. I like that. Cons: - It feels a little... kitsch-y to me? Listening to the third track, Mr. Spaceman, sounds like some faux classic rock music? Like something Tim and Eric would make in order to make fun of classic rock?... - I kind of felt bored by it and I don't really have a great reason for it being on this list.

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Not sure this one has aged that well - except for Eight Miles High - it was probably quite new and different in 1966!

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